Fire Safety for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Double Your Chances of Surviving a Home Fire

Smoke alarms save countless lives every year. Most people who die in home fires are not in the room where the fire starts. Working smoke alarms alert people to fire and give them time to escape in a situation where minutes can mean the difference between surviving and not surviving.

However, there are 28 million deaf and hard of hearing Americans who are unable to rely on this life-saving warning sound to alert them of fire and people who are deaf or hard of hearing face a high risk for fire and fire-related injury.

One of the most significant advances designed to address the fire safety needs of the deaf and hard of hearing community is the audible smoke alarm. These specialized alarms are available to Montgomery County residents. The Montgomery County Fire and Rescue Service and the United States Fire Administration (USFA) have teamed up to provide the following important information:

Why are Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons at Risk?

Install and Maintain Smoke Alarms

Deaf and hard of hearing persons cannot rely on the traditional audible smoke alarm, but can rely on visual alarms equipped with strobe lights.

Don't Isolate Yourself

Plan Your Escape

In Case of Fire

Additional Resources